Planting on Dinosaur Island.

How we plant on Dinosaur Island; screen capture of the planting interface.

How we plant on Dinosaur Island; screen capture of the planting interface.

It’s spring on Dinosaur Island and that means it’s time to start planting! Above is a screen capture of the interface to add plants to Dinosaur Island, select the terrain / environment in which they grow (remember all the work on creating the terrain previously?), select images for the plants for their three stages of development (we have an agreement with xFrog who created these prehistoric plants, and, lastly, ‘plant’ this vegetation in the appropriate terrain / environment.

We’re looking at starting off with 20 different types of plants and trees. We will be tracking each individual plant, shrub or tree throughout its entire life cycle. We will also track its health.

The above screen capture is another glimpse ‘behind the scenes’ of Dinosaur Island. Most users probably won’t want to get this involved, but we need to have this capability to create different environments, with the appropriate flora, for the various eras of dinosaurs.

Things are progressing rapidly on Dinosaur Island. Next week: see the results of planting all these ferns, bushes and trees. And, after that, it’s time for the dinosaurs!

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The terrain of Dinosaur Island.

Dinosaur Island terrain displayed in false colors.

Dinosaur Island terrain displayed in false colors.

Above is a view of Dinosaur Island with the different terrain types displayed in vivid or ‘false colors’. Below is a view of the same terrain types displayed as a transparency over the elevation map of the island.

The terrain of Dinosaur Island displayed as a transparency over the elevation map.

The terrain of Dinosaur Island displayed as a transparency over the elevation map.

Terrain type legend.

Terrain type legend.

The color legend of the different terrain types is at left.

This is exciting news! Well, it is for us on the team because it means that we now have the tools to rapidly create islands and ‘paint’ with the different terrain types. This should be exciting news for you, too, because this means that users (like you) can create your own Dinosaur Islands, too!

So, what’s next?

We will be adding the interface so we can start ‘planting’ vegetation around the island. Every plant grows only in certain terrains. Now you know why we had to create the ‘terrain map’ of Dinosaur Island first.

You know what happens after we add the plants? We start adding the dinosaurs that live on the plants!

 

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How to build a swamp.

Building a swamp on Dinosaur Island.

Building a swamp on Dinosaur Island.

Today’s post shows a screen shot of the process of building up a swamp on Dinosaur Island. The dark blue area is salt water. The alternating brown and yellow bands are sandy and swampy areas. This process was automated by using a “flood fill” algorithm that is now built into the Dinosaur Island program.

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Building Dinosaur Island.

Building Dinosaur Island: a look at how terrain, elevation and environmental models are built.

Building Dinosaur Island: a look at how terrain, elevation and environmental models are built.

This is the first peek behind the scenes where you can see how we are building  Dinosaur Island. This will be either really cool, or really boring, so hang on. If you’re a nerd at heart and want to learn how these types of programs are written then today’s post is for you. If this is the kind of thing that bores you to tears you should probably go check out the Dinosaurs in the News section; lots of cool stuff there.

We have been writing M&S (Modeling & Simulation) programs since the mid 1980s. M&S programs are used to model very complex environments and behaviors. For many years we have been working on high-end wargames and emergency disaster simulations for the U.S. Department of Defense, DARPA and other government organizations. While Dinosaur Island doesn’t seem like an M&S program, it really is. In fact, we are modeling Dinosaur Island in greater detail than any of the programs that we’ve done in the past.

For every square meter of Dinosaur Island we need to know:

  • The elevation (in meters).
  • The type of terrain (swamp, forest, fresh water, etc.).
  • The vegetation (every plant and where it is in its life cycle).
  • Any dinosaurs (or considering their size, any parts of dinosaurs in this particular square meter).

This, obviously, is a lot of data. So, one of the first tasks in creating a very large M&S project like Dinosaur Island is to first create the tools that facilitate entering all this data. In the picture at the top of today’s post is a screen shot of the Dinosaur Island editing software. This allows us to read in bitmap files (BMPs) that are 2,000 x 2,000 pixels, convert them to height maps and use the data to display the resulting landscape. Next, we can start adding different terrain types (in the above picture, we’ve just added the salt water and fresh water areas on the island).

We traditionally make these editors available to the users (that’s you) to create their own models and environments. How would you like to make your own Dinosaur Island?

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First images of Dinosaur Island!

As we discussed in a previous post, Dinosaur Island will be 2 kilometers by 2 kilometers. We have also decided to let the users (that’s you!) create their own islands! Ed Isenberg, who has worked with me since 1986 on numerous computer games, has created the first ‘maps’ for Dinosaur Island and then has rendered them in 3D. We are using a standard 256 grayscale bitmap, PNG or GIF file as the ‘map’.

Dinosaur Island (Version 1) by Ed Isenberg

Dinosaur Island (Version 1) by Ed Isenberg

And this is the 256 levels of grayscale ‘map’ that Ed created from which the 3D image (above) was rendered.

Dinosaur Island grey scale map created by Ed Isenberg.

Below is Ed’s idea for a volcanic Dinosaur Island.

Volcanic Dinosaur Island created by Ed Isenberg.

Volcanic Dinosaur Island created by Ed Isenberg.

And the 256 gray scale map that Ed created from which the 3D image, above, was rendered.

Volcanic Dinosaur Island gray scale map by Ed Isenberg.

 

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